10 Things To Know About the Required Beginning Date For IRAs

This article, written by Ed Slott IRA Analyst, Sarah Brenner, originally ran on The Slott Report.

Photo by Anthony DELANOIX on Unsplash

Adding money to an IRA is easy. Knowing when and how to take money out of an IRA while complying with all the rules and regulations surrounding IRAs and retirement plans — that is the tricky part.

All IRA owners must begin taking Required Minimum Distributions or RMDs from their IRA by April 1 of the year after the year they turn 70 ½.

But the rules don’t stop there.

This article, written by Ed Slott IRA Analyst, Sarah Brenner, originally ran on The Slott Report.

You can learn more about IRAs from Ed Slott and his team, by clicking here.

2019 IRA and 401(k) Contribution Limits Rise

 

The personal savings rate in the United States hit 6% in 2018.  Relatively speaking that’s not a bad number.  Unfortunately, it probably won’t get you to your long-term financial goals.

It may sound obvious, but if you want to have more money when you retire, you are going to have to save more money when you are working.

Fortunately, the annual limits on how much you can contribute to your IRA, 401k and other workplace retirement savings plans are pretty generous. What’s more, they’ve been increased for 2019.

Ed Slott Live on PBS

How to take your IRA from "forever taxed to never taxed"

Last week I wrote about what it means to be an Ed Slott trained IRA advisor. Since then, I have learned that Ed Slott’s program “Retire Safe and Secure” will air on our local, Twin Cities Public Television stations this weekend!

If you want to learn how to avoid the most common tax mistakes people make with their retirement accounts, or why a Roth IRA is so important, or how to take your IRA from “forever taxed to never taxed” you will want to watch or record Ed’s show this weekend.

Ed Slott has been a huge supporter of Public Television for many years and is one of PBS’ all-time largest fundraisers. His programs have raised over $50 million in donations supporting PBS stations across the country. This weekend you can watch him on your local station.

Times and dates are listed below. Check with Twin Cities PBS for more information or click here.

  •  Retire Safe & Secure with Ed Slott | Friday, Jun 8 at 6pm TPT LIFE
  •  Retire Safe & Secure with Ed Slott | Saturday, Jun 9 at 11:30am TPT 2
  •  Retire Safe & Secure with Ed Slott | Saturday, Jun 9 at 9:30pm TPT LIFE
  •  Retire Safe & Secure with Ed Slott | Sunday, Jun 10 at 3am TPT LIFE
  •  Retire Safe & Secure with Ed Slott | Saturday, Jun 30 at 7pm TPT LIFE

Now this is must see TV.

Looking for an Ed Slott trained “Elite IRA Advisor”? Call me at 651.379.3935 or email me directly at mpbranch@focusfinancial.com

 

Ed Slott’s Elite IRA Advisor Group is solely an indication that the financial advisor has attended training provided by Ed Slott and Company.  Ed Slott is not affiliated with Royal Alliance Associates, Inc.

3 Big Reasons Why Dividends Should Be Part of Your Retirement Income Plan

Photo by Matthieu Da Cruz on Unsplash

Imagine an investment that offers you a predictable, consistent income that rises over time. One that, while not guaranteed, is reliable and has been used by countless others to generate income during retirement.

What is the source of this idyllic income stream? Dividends. More specifically, dividends from publicly traded companies or mutual funds that own them.

To learn more about what a dividend is, click here.

If you ate cereal for breakfast, drank a soft drink at lunch, and drove to the store to pick up a few things on your way home from work, odds you consumed several products that were made by companies that have been distributing cash to shareholders via dividends for many years.

Dividends might not be the sexiest investment you will ever own, but they should play a vital role in your retirement income plan.

Below are 3 big reasons why dividends should be part of your retirement income plan: 

Why A Roth IRA Should Be Part Of Your Retirement Income Plan

Photo by Mathieu Turle on Unsplash

Roth IRAs were created 20 years ago to give investors a way to invest for retirement that allowed for tax-free distributions after age 59 ½.

But they came with a catch.

These new IRAs were to be funded with after-tax contributions. Unlike traditional, tax-deductible IRAs and workplace retirement plans like 401(k) accounts, contributions to Roth IRAs are not tax deductible.

Since then, investors have debated whether it’s best to fund a Roth IRA or a traditional, tax-deductible IRA. Strong arguments can be made for both, but most financial professionals agree: whenever possible, the Roth IRA should be part of your retirement income plan.

Here’s why: