A New Way To Look At Your Bucket List

When I turned 50 I had an ambitious bucket list. Most of the items on my list were things that I wanted to do “some day”. I quickly realized that “some day” may never come, and that if I ever wanted to check any of my bucket list items off the list that I had better get started.

In fact, some of the most important things on my bucket list were simple, day-to-day things that I was at risk of missing out on if I didn’t make them a priority in my life.

Below is a short video that suggests a different way to look at your bucket list.

 

A New Way to Look at Your Bucket List

 

 

All Hands on Hope

Katey McCabe, and her son, Fritz (age 6), volunteering at the 2017 packing event for Feed My Starving Children.

Earlier this month I had the chance to participate in a MobilePack™ event at Incarnation Lutheran Church in Shoreview, MN. It’s become an annual tradition for me and my family.

Since I also make a monthly financial contribution to Feed My Starving Children on behalf of my clients, it’s also a great opportunity to see my investment at work, actively participate in this event and help assemble the packages of soy, rice, vitamins and veggies that will be distributed to children around the world.

The theme for this year’s event was “All Hands On Hope”. To paraphrase Pastor Gary Medin, Senior Pastor at Incarnation, if you contributed financially to this event or to the church’s capital campaign or volunteered to help assemble meals, you have a hand in making this possible.

To that I would add, if you are a client of mine, you too have had a hand in supporting the life giving work of Feed My Starving Children. Thank you for your continued support and for your part in making this event possible.

Below is a “repost” of an article I posted last year describing this event. This post has been updated with current stats and facts. 

Why Financial Planning Is An Act Of Love

3 ways your financial plan says "I love you"

Photo by freestocks.org on Unsplash

According to the National Retail Federation, Americans will spend an estimated $19.6 billion on Valentine’s Day this year. With a little more than half of the American population participating in Valentine’s Day giving, that breaks down to about $143 per person.

While chocolates, candied hearts or a night out on the town can be great ways to express your love, I would argue that financial planning may be the ultimate act that says, “I love you and I care about you”.

Here’s why: 

Don’t Let These 5 Myths About Gifting Assets Stop Your Holiday Giving

Photo by Ben White on Unsplash

As we approach the end of the year, you may be thinking of making a large financial gift to your children, grandchildren or others in your life.

Gifting strategies and the tax laws that create them can be confusing. Even as I write this, Congress is considering major legislation that could impact generational gifting for millions of Americans in the future.

Don’t let these 5 myths about gifting assets stop your holiday giving this year.

After 25 Years, This Is What I Am Thankful For

 

November 22nd, 1992.

That was my first official day as a financial planner. For several months, I had been working hard to get licensed, establish a network of contacts, and get set up to hit the ground running, but Wednesday, November 22, 1992 was my official first day on the job.

My manager generously allowed me to celebrate by taking the next day off. The fact that the next day was Thanksgiving and he wanted to spend it with his family, I am sure was just a coincidence.

Back then, the only days we had off were Sundays and major Federal holidays. The Friday after Thanksgiving was not one of them. So, on Friday the 24th I was back at it – or maybe I should say “at it” since I hadn’t really even gotten started yet.